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Reservations: 808-921-2345

RATES & AVAILABILITY

21 - Sep
'
(Nearby Event: )
Where:Doris Duke Theatre, 900 S Beretania St, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States, 96814
Traditionally, Kilo Hōkū is known as the the act of observing the stars, especially in navigation. Astronomers examine the night skies to chart their paths to a sometimes known destination, or at others, an unknown or uncharted destination.  The Purple Maiʻa Foundation has been on its own uncharted route since 2016 when it began its Purple Prize Indigenous Innovation Challenge. We've been navigating the way for the indigenous people of Hawaiʻi and our settler allies to build unprecedented, culturally-grounded technologies and ventures that optimize for community abundance and sustainability across the pae ʻāina.  But every year we run the Purple Prize, we give the public a chance to kilo hōkū, observe the stars. The stars are our entrepreneurs; our indigenous innovators.  A panel of five esteemed judges, who are leaders in the Venture Capital, government, and innovation spaces, will select three teams to be awarded prizes that in past years have exceeded $16,000!  This year, 12 teams are competing. You can check them out at https://purpleprize.com/building-phase-teams/ RSVP, kilo hōkū, be inspired, and learn what it means to innovate the maoli way! Judges will be announced on September 10.  Mahalo to our Sponsors Your logo could be here! Contact alec@purplemaia.org if you are interested in sponsoring Kilo Hōkū! About the theater The Honolulu Museum of Art has had a film program since the 1930s, when it showed classic films in Central Courtyard. Screenings moved to what is now the Doris Duke Theatre in 1977. The theater was named in honor of Doris Duke, who was a generous philanthropist and supporter of Islamic art and culture, jazz and other music and performing arts. Anna Rice Cooke, Clare Boothe Luce, and Doris Duke are connected by their contributions to the arts that continue to benefit the people of Hawai‘i. Anna Rice Cooke founded of the Honolulu Museum of Art; Clare Boothe Luce endowed the building that contains the museum's theater; and the Doris Duke Founda
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